Lead Text: 
Katia Melizer has 19 years’ experience in the industry

Fairmont Dubai has appointed Katia Melizer as its director of housekeeping.

Prior to this role, Melizer was the director of housekeeping at the Fairmont Marina Abu Dhabi, there she was part of the pre-opening team since April 2018.

Before she took up that role, Melizer was the assisting the housekeeping department at the Raffles Hotel in Singapore to reopen the property after a two-year renovation.

She has a total of 19 years’ experience in the industry and started her career in 2012 as an executive housekeeper at the Sofitel Abu Dhabi Corniche. In 2014 she relocated to its sister property Sofitel Dubai Downtown.

Prior to moving to the UAE, Melizer worked at hotels in France and Morocco, such as Hotel de Crillon in Paris and Hotel Palais Namaskar in Marrakech.

Article Context: 
News
Priyanka Praveen
Story Relations: 
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Published Date: 
Monday, October 21, 2019 - 10:30
Modified Date: 
Monday, October 21, 2019 - 10:35

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