Hilton Garden Inn Ras Al Khaimah set to provide seaplane tours

The water-sports and seaplane activities in RAK will take place twice a week

Priced at AED 1,295 per person, each seaplane holds six to eight guests
Priced at AED 1,295 per person, each seaplane holds six to eight guests

Ras Al Khaimah's Hilton Garden Inn has owned its first jetty, allowing for more water-related activities and entertainment.

Twice a week a Seawings seaplane will take off from the Dubai Creekside port to take guests on a 45-minute tour from Dubai to Ras Al Khaimah, the seaplane will then land in the RAK hotel's new jetty.

The hotel assures that the new seaplane service in the emirate is also a good alternative commute option for the busy professional. It will also drop guests back to the Dubai Creek location.

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During the flight, guests will see the Burj Khalifa, Palm Jumeirah, Burj Al Arab, as well as the Hajar Mountains.

Priced at AED 1,295 per person, each seaplane holds six to eight guests.

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