Emirates Palace’s Hakkasan offers Chinese New Year activations

The Chinese venue will serve a set menu comprising traditional dishes

Named Lucky Jie, the dessert will be in the shape of a red knot
Named Lucky Jie, the dessert will be in the shape of a red knot

Emirates Palace’s Hakkasan restaurant will serve a set menu made for the Chinese New Year.

Served from January 24 to February 8, the menu will consist of three traditional Chinese dishes. Dishes include golden treasure pockets with abalone and wild mushrooms, followed by wok-fried scallop with taro mousseline and brown butter black bean sauce.

Next is the desert, described as the centrepiece of the menu, a caramel ganache with mandarin, chili and cocoa. Named Lucky Jie, the dessert will be in the shape of a red knot; the menu also features a cocktail for guests.

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Served indoors and outdoors, the menu will be priced at AED 498 per person.

The venue’s operations manager, Milos Zekovic added: “We invite our guests to write their wishes on red ribbons - the red colour is considered a symbol of joy - to hang around the restaurant, wishing them hope, happiness, luck and fortune on the special occasion.”

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