Hyatt to expand lifestyle hotel portfolio across Middle East

Hyatt announced it expects new hotels in the UAE, KSA and Oman by 2023

Andaz Dubai The Palm, UAE
Andaz Dubai The Palm, UAE

Hospitality group Hyatt Hotels has announced it plans to grow its portfolio of lifestyle hotels across the Middle East. Four new properties are expected to open by 2023 in the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Oman.

From 2019 to 2023, more than 1,300 keys are expected to be added to the region, taking the number of Hyatt lifestyle hotels in the Middle Eastern region to seven.

The hotels are as follows:

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Andaz Dubai The Palm, UAE

Opening (approx.): Late 2019

This hotel shall be the first Andaz branded property in Dubai and the second in the UAE, the first was the Andaz Capital Gate Abu Dhabi.

The hotel will feature two 15-storey towers, along with 217 guest rooms, 166 serviced-apartments, four restaurants, along with a fitness centre, spa and beachfront access.

Hyatt Centric Dubai La Mer, UAE

Opening (approx.): 2020

The first Hyatt Centric hotel in the UAE. The hotel will comprise 156 rooms and suites, two restaurants, meeting facilities, a rooftop bar, and a pool area.

Alila Hinu May, Oman

Opening (approx.): 2020

Offering hospitality, marine life and nature reserves on a nearby coastline, the hotel will have a focus on sustainability.

The beachfront resort will comprise 112 retreats and villas. It will be the second Alila resort in Oman.

Jabal Omar Hyatt Centric Makkah Hotel and Residences, Saudi Arabia

Opening (approx.): 2023

Situated near the Grand Mosque of Makkah, the hotel will mark Hyatt Centric’s debut into the Kingdom.

The hotel will feature 196 guestrooms and suites, as well as 200 residences offering modern design elements and traditional inspirations.

Hyatt and Two Roads Hospitality 

Following Hyatt’s acquisition of Two Roads Hospitality in November 2018, it has been bolstering its presence in the lifestyle hospitality market.

Hyatt launched Andaz, Alila, Hyatt Centric, Joie de Vivre and Thompson Hotels, following the acquisition.

Kurt Straub, vice president of operations for the Middle East, Africa and South West Asia for Hyatt said: “The Middle East is seeing a rising demand for lifestyle hotels. At Hyatt, we aim to grow with intent. And with that in mind, we strive to expand our brand presence in the region by introducing lifestyle-driven brands that cater to the needs of our guests and, at the same time, fit very well into their locations.”

Frederic Flageat-Simon, Hyatt’s global head of lifestyle operations said: "Our guests' preferences keep evolving, and we want to ensure that we cater to every traveller’s needs and desires,”

He continued: “The introduction of a dedicated lifestyle division reflects our commitment to further carve out Hyatt's role in the ever-growing lifestyle segment. We have identified this segment as a key growth driver for us and strive to advance care for our guests and meet their preference towards personalized, rare and meaningful experiences.”

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