UAE cabinet approves five-year tourist visa

It is not yet known whether there will be a visa application fee

Currently tourists can visit with free multiple entry for up to 90 days
Currently tourists can visit with free multiple entry for up to 90 days

A multi-entry five-year tourist visa has been approved for the UAE.

The decision was made at the UAE Cabinet's first meeting of the year and H.H. Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, UAE Prime Minister and Vice President and Ruler of Dubai said on Twitter the visa plan was approved. 

The visa will allow tourists numerous enteries over a five year period according to sister publication Arabian Business

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Currently tourists can visit with free multiple entry for up to 90 days. It is not known yet if the five-year visa will carry a fee.

Abu Dhabi and Dubai saw 15.88 million international tourists in the first nine months of 2019. Sheikh Mohammed stated that the visa will help establish the UAE as a "major global tourism destination".

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