Restaurants in Saudi no longer required to be gender segregated

The ministry of municipalities has said it will be for restaurants to decide

Saudi Arabia has been undergoing a range of sweeping reforms to make it more open including the introduction of tourist visas recently
Saudi Arabia has been undergoing a range of sweeping reforms to make it more open including the introduction of tourist visas recently

Restaurants in Saudi Arabia will no longer be required to have separate entrances segregated by gender.

The ministry of municipalities in the Kingdom has said it will now be up to restaurants to decide for themselves if they wish to remain gender segregated, sister publication Caterer Middle East reported. 

The official statements follows an easing of the practice in recent months, with more and more restaurants no longer enforcing the rules which saw women and families eat separately from men on their own.

Saudi Arabia has been undergoing a range of sweeping reforms to make it more open including the introduction of tourist visas recently.

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