You can now perform Umrah on a Saudi tourist visa

The cost of applying for an e-visa or a visa on arrival is 440 saudi riyals (around $117) plus VAT.

The tourist visa allows for a stay of up to three months per entry
The tourist visa allows for a stay of up to three months per entry

People visiting Saudi Arabia on a tourism visa can now perform Umrah in the kingdom. In addition to that, women will not need to be accompanied by a male relative other than during the Haj season, according to a report by Saudi Gazette.

The report also added that through this visa there won’t be a need for a sponsor.

On Friday September 27, Saudi Arabia made history with the announcement that tourist visas will be available to citizens from 49 countries. The development is expected to create one million new jobs for the country by 2030.

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The tourist visa allows for a stay of up to three months per entry, with visitors able to spend up to 90 days per year in the country. The visa is valid for one year with multiple entries.

The cost of applying for an e-visa or a visa on arrival is 440 saudi riyals (around $117) plus VAT.

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