India’s Oyo threatens legal action against groups for trying to disrupt business

According to reports, around 67 partner hotels went on a strike for two days

Image used for illustrative purpose only
Image used for illustrative purpose only

India’s hospitality group Oyo Hotels and Homes has threatened to take legal action against groups for trying to disrupt its business, Indian media reported.

According to reports, around 67 partner hotels went on a strike for two days.

Owners alleged that Oyo’s policies were destroying small and medium hotels. According to the New Indian Express, protesters demanded the return of price determination rights to hotel owners.

Partner hotel owners were reportedly unhappy with the company over issues including alleged disregard to agreed floor prices, deep discounting, non-transparent charges, and one-sided enforcement of contracts, YourStory reported.

However, Delhi High Court has come to the support of the company by restraining hoteliers welfare associations from issuing any notices or boycotting the company as it violates their contract.

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