Work begins on Dubai's The Island featuring Las Vegas hotel brands

The Island will feature more 1,400 hotel rooms, suites and apartments

Image courtesy: Brewer Smith Brewer Group
Image courtesy: Brewer Smith Brewer Group

Work on Dubai’s The Island project, that will house Las Vegas hotel brands such as MGM, Bellagio, and Aria, has begun.

According to a report by sister title Construction Week Online, architecture firm Brewer Smith Brewer Group (BSBG), revealed that marine and enabling works had recently commenced on Wasl Hospitality and Leisure’s The Island project in Dubai.

Located on a 10.5ha island off the coast of Umm Suqeim in Dubai, The Island will feature 1,400 hotel rooms, suites, and apartments, in addition to retail, food and beverage, and anchored entertainment options, BSBG said.

The Island, which will feature more than 1,400 hotel rooms, suites and apartments, retail, F&B and a number of key anchor entertainment destinations, was initially announced by developer wasl Hospitality & Leisure in March 2017, when early concepts were presented to His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai.

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