Startling lack of Middle Eastern GMs

Nationalisation efforts have long way to go in hospitality and tourism

Flying the flag - Britain provides largest number of Middle East GMs.
Flying the flag - Britain provides largest number of Middle East GMs.

Just 2% of the Middle East's hotel GMs are GCC nationals, the latest survey from Hotelier Middle East has revealed.

In spite of Middle East governments’ attempts to encourage nationals into boom industries, such as travel and tourism, few locally-born employees are making it to the top of the hospitality ladder.

The second annual Hotelier Middle East GM Survey, carried out on HotelierMiddleEast.com over the past six weeks, discovered that Europeans still dominate the general management landscape in the region, with 12% of GMs born in the UK, 10% hailing from France and the Netherlands accounting for 9% of local GMs.

Did you like this story?
Click here for more

There are also several GMs from Switzerland, Pakistan, Morocco, Italy and India running regional hotels; however, not a single UAE-born GM answered the GM Survey.

The wider Middle East fared little better, with the exception of Lebanon which provides around 7% of the region’s hotel general managers.

For all the latest hospitality news from UAE, Gulf countries and around the world, follow us on Twitter and Linkedin, like us on Facebook and subscribe to our YouTube page.

Most Popular

Newsletter

Reports

Human Capital Report 2017

Human Capital Report 2017

The second annual Hotelier Middle East Human Capital Report is designed to explore the issues, challenges and opportunities facing hospitality professionals responsible for the hotel industry’s most important asset – its people. The report combines the results of Hotelier Middle East's HR Leaders Survey with exclusive interviews with the region's senior human resources directors.

Hotelier Middle East Housekeeping Report 2016

Hotelier Middle East Housekeeping Report 2016

The Hotelier Middle East Housekeeping Report 2016 provides essential business insight into this critical hotel function, revealing a gradual move towards the use of automated management and a commitment to sustainability, concerns over recruitment, retention and staff outsourcing, and the potential to deliver much more, if only the industry's "image problem" can be reversed.

From the edition

From the magazine