Accor’s Raffles Hotels to debut in India, to open two new properties

Hospitality group Accor’s Raffles Hotels and Resorts will make its entry into the Indian market with two properties in Udaipur and Jaipur.

Sebastien Bazin
Sebastien Bazin

Hospitality group Accor’s Raffles Hotels and Resorts will make its entry into the Indian market with two properties in Udaipur and Jaipur.

 

According to the group, the hotel in Udaipur is set on a 21-acre private island in the midst of Udai Sagar Lake, one of the five prominent lakes of Udaipur. The property has 101 lake-facing rooms and is expected to open by mid-2020.

Meanwhile, the Raffles Jaipur is coming up in Kukas, a town in Jaipur. The property comprises secluded private residences and courtyards adjacent to the larger hotel complex that presently houses the Fairmont Jaipur. The hotel is anticipated to start operations in 2022

At a media briefing in Mumbai, Sebastien Bazin, chairman and CEO of Accor said that the company is planning to increase their presence in India and is looking to add 24 hotels in the next two to three years.

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