This 12-course tasting menu has “less calories than a happy meal”

According to the restaurateur behind Dubai’s new Indian restaurant Masala Library by Jiggs Kalra, its 12-course tasting menu has “less calories than a Happy Meal”

Food & beverage, Restaurants

Zorawar Kalra, the restaurateur behind Dubai’s new Indian restaurant Masala Library by Jiggs Kalra, told sister title Caterer Middle East that its 12-course tasting menu has “less calories than a Happy Meal”.

 

The children’s meal from McDonald’s can have anything in the region of 1,500 calories per serving, but Kalra said Masala Library’s “well balanced menu” will have fewer than that in its attempt to “introduce the entire spectrum of flavours that India offers in one sitting”.

Although it is 12-courses, Kalra said the tasting menu is a “snacky concept” featuring five or six snacks, some appetisers, then two or three mains.
There is also an a la carte menu for those customers who know exactly what they want.

Masala Library, which Kalra describes as “post-modern and post-molecular food”, is set to open in the JW Marriott Marquis in March, and is the first of the brand’s outlets to open outside of India.

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