Marriott International’s Abu Dhabi hotels support Special Olympics World Games 2019

Marriott International properties in Abu Dhabi are gearing up to support the Special Olympics World Games Abu Dhabi 2019

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Marriott International properties in Abu Dhabi are gearing up to support the upcoming Special Olympics World Games Abu Dhabi 2019. 

 

Apart from being one of the official suppliers of the event, over 230 of their associates will volunteer their service over the 10 days of the games, resulting in more than 5,500 voluntary hours.   

The company is also cheering for their employee, Rebecca Hatcher who will be representing the UAE in the swimming competition at the World Games. Hatcher is a student at the Future Rehabilitation Centre School in Abu Dhabi and a member of the housekeeping department at the Yas Hotel Abu Dhabi.

According to the company’s officials, the volunteered hours will contribute to Marriott International’s Sustainability and Social Impact Platform, Serve 360: Doing Good in Every Direction.

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