'Highest lounge in the world' opens in Dubai's Burj Khalifa

Emaar has unveiled The Lounge, Burj Khalifa, said to be the highest lounge in the world on Levels 152, 153 and 154

Food & beverage, Restaurants

Emaar has opened doors to the highest point in Burj Khalifa at levels 152, 153 and 154 (at 575m), with The Lounge, Burj Khalifa.

The venue spans the three floors that have been converted into a lounge, with food coming in straight from the kitchen of the Armani Hotel Dubai.

The Lounge will offer a variety of options at different times of the day including high tea, sundowners, and evening cocktails. The High Tea is priced AED 550 (US$150) per person, inclusive of a spread of fresh bakes, desserts, teas and of a glass of house beverage. The Sundowner and Evening experience are AED 600 ($163) per person, inclusive of unlimited canapes and one house beverage.

The Lounge, Burj Khalifa will feature live music daily and international artists and performers.

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