Jumeirah Al Naseem's Summersalt launches Japanese pop-up

Umi Shio, meaning 'sea salt' in Japanese, has been launched by Japanese-Argentinian chef Cristian Goya

Food & beverage, Restaurants

Summersalt at Jumeirah Al Naseem has launched a Japanese fusion pop-up concept, Umi Shio, created by the venue's Japanese-Argentinian chef, Cristian Goya.

Umi Shio serves a fusion of Japanese and South American flavours, alongside Japanese-inspired cocktails, mocktails, and varieties of sake.

Sharing dishes is encouraged, and the menu includes dishes such as roasted langoustines in a sweet and sour sauce and miso caramelised eggplant, seabass ceviche, salmon tataki, and more.

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Umi Shio represents the F&B ambitions of Jumeirah, which now has CEO Jose Silva and chief culinary officer Michael Ellis leading the change.

The restaurant can cater for up to 90 diners both inside and outside, and also has a separate shisha lounge.

 

 

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