After Dubai, India's Oyo Rooms eyes European markets

Oyo received $1 billion in funding from a consortium of investors led by SoftBank in September, making it one of India's wealthiest startups

Oyo, Oyo hotels, Ritesh Agarwal

India's Oyo Hotels recently announced its entry into the United Arab Emirates, starting with the launch of its operations in Dubai, Sharjah and Fujairah. Now the Indian company is next looking to European market to further its expansion plans.

"We are seeing great results in all our global markets and are growing aggressively in London," Oyo's founder, 25-year-old Ritesh Agarwal, told AFP.

"We will definitely consider expanding into the broader European region," he added in the telephone interview.

Oyo chain of hotels is currently present in over 350 cities with over 12,000 asset partners spread across six countries including India, China, Malaysia, Nepal, the UK and now UAE in the Middle East, It also plans to open over 12,000 rooms within 150 hotels across the UAE by 2020.

For all the latest hospitality news from UAE, Gulf countries and around the world, follow us on Twitter and Linkedin, like us on Facebook and subscribe to our YouTube page.

Most Popular

Newsletter

Reports

Human Capital Report 2017

Human Capital Report 2017

The second annual Hotelier Middle East Human Capital Report is designed to explore the issues, challenges and opportunities facing hospitality professionals responsible for the hotel industry’s most important asset – its people. The report combines the results of Hotelier Middle East's HR Leaders Survey with exclusive interviews with the region's senior human resources directors.

Hotelier Middle East Housekeeping Report 2016

Hotelier Middle East Housekeeping Report 2016

The Hotelier Middle East Housekeeping Report 2016 provides essential business insight into this critical hotel function, revealing a gradual move towards the use of automated management and a commitment to sustainability, concerns over recruitment, retention and staff outsourcing, and the potential to deliver much more, if only the industry's "image problem" can be reversed.

From the edition

From the magazine