China milk scandal verdicts

Verdicts have been announced for several defendants in the case of Chinese dairy firms selling infected baby milk

A baby drinks coconut milk mixed with waer. [Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images]
A baby drinks coconut milk mixed with waer. [Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images]

Several defendants have been found guilty in the case of Chinese dairy firms selling infected baby milk that led to the deaths of at least six infants.

Tests revealed the industrial chemical melamine was being mixed into milk to give the illusion of higher protein levels.

The discovery sparked a global outcry that saw various international authorities, including the UAE’s General Secretariat of Municipalities, ban Chinese dairy and related products.

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Two senior managers at Sanlu, a leading dairy company and the first to have sold infected products, have been found guilty now face execution.

Meanwhile, the former head of Sanlu received a life sentence.

The Chinese government has ordered 22 companies found to have sold contaminated milk to pay US $160 million compensation to the families affected.

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