Turkish airline nearly skids off runway into the sea

Pegasus Airlines flight had taken off smoothly from the capital Ankara

A Pegasus Airlines Boeing 737 passenger plane is seen struck in mud on an embankment, a day after skidding off the airstrip, after landing at Trabzon's airport on the Black Sea coast on January 14, 2018.
A Pegasus Airlines Boeing 737 passenger plane is seen struck in mud on an embankment, a day after skidding off the airstrip, after landing at Trabzon's airport on the Black Sea coast on January 14, 2018.

A Pegasus Airline passenger plane had a narrow escape where it skidded off the runway just metres away from the sea as it landed at an airport in northern Turkey, according to an AFP report.

The flight PC8622 arrived at the Black Sea resort from Ankara on January 13.

According to reports, the Pegasus Airlines flight had taken off smoothly from the capital Ankara and landed in Trabzon, but skidded off the runway in the northern airport. No one was injured or killed in the landing.

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