Stella Di Mare Hotel set to open in Dubai Marina

The 31-storey art deco-style hotel will feature a rooftop bar overlooking the marina

Stella Di Mare set to open Dubai Marina.
Stella Di Mare set to open Dubai Marina.

The Stella Di Mare Dubai Marina Hotel is all set to open in early 2018. This is the first hotel in Dubai for the Egyptian brand.

The hotel will feature three restaurants and three bars including a rooftop bar for the guests to enjoy.

La Fontana will provide an all-day international buffet, Triton offers fusion and Mediterranean food and Leonardo, with interiors inspired by Leonardo Da Vinci, will feature Italian cuisine.

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Besides the Orphic Bar at the lobby lounge, the hotel includes a pool bar that offers daily refreshments and the Skyland, a rooftop bar on the 31st floor that will offer spectacular views of the marina.

Founded in 2000, Stella Di Mare Hotels & Resorts, the hospitality arm of Remco Tourism Villages Construction SAE, already has six hotels in three locations in Egypt. 

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