UAE, Kazakh officials sign visa agreements

Agreements have been signed in Abu Dhabi on diplomatic missions, visa exemptions and tourism between the UAE and Kazakhstan

Astan, Kazakhstan.
Astan, Kazakhstan.

Agreements have been signed in Abu Dhabi on diplomatic missions, visa exemptions and tourism between the UAE and Kazakhstan.

The two countries agreed to amend an agreement on mutual visa exemptions and establish a consular commission, in addition to allocating land for diplomatic missions, reported state news agency Wam.

Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces, and Kazakh president Nursultan Nazarbayev witnessed the signing of the various agreements on Sunday at Al Mushrif Palace in Abu Dhabi.

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Approximately 200 Emirati companies operate in Kazakhstan, where UAE investments from 2005 to the first quarter of 2016 reached US$2 billion (AED7.3bn).

Non-oil trade between the countries was reported to be $185 million (AED679.5m) in 2015.

 

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