Makkah to Saudise 80% of hotel jobs

The Ministry of Labour and Social Development in Makkah is set to Saudise 80% of jobs in the region's hotels and tourist resorts by the end of 2016

Makkah, Saudi Arabia.
Makkah, Saudi Arabia.

The Ministry of Labour and Social Development in Makkah is set to Saudise 80% of jobs in the region’s hotels and tourist resorts by the end of 2016.

The plan is scheduled to be carried out in cooperation with the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) and Human Resources Development Fund (Hadaf), according to local media, citing Ministry of Labour and Social Development province director Abdullah Bin Muhammad Al-Olayyan.

During his recent inspection of the headquarters of the First Saudisation Forum for Accommodation Sector Occupations in Makkah, Al-Olayyan said Saudi employees must be disciplined, punctual and diligent.

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Al-Olayyan called on the Saudi youth to register on the ‘Taqat’ website, the Hadaf programme and the SCTH website so that they can be contacted regarding suitable jobs, reported Al-Madina Arabic.

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