Jumeirah unveils details of Madinat Jumeirah hotel

Jumeirah Al Naseem to share facilities with existing Madinat Jumeirah complex

Jumeirah Al Naseem
Jumeirah Al Naseem

Jumeirah Group has revealed its new 430-key property, part of the Madinat Jumeirah expansion, will be called Jumeirah Al Naseem.

The hotel, scheduled to open in 2016 will feature three swimming pools, private beach access, and two banqueting rooms, which will complement the existing conference and events facilities at Madinat Jumeirah.

Guests will also have access to the Madinat Theatre, the resort’s waterways, and over 50 restaurants and bars within the development.

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When it launches in 2016, the AED 2.5billion ($680mn) expansion will feature a villa complex, restaurants, a commercial centre featuring retail stores and an open walking area.

The group of villas and hotel apartments in the project will be run by Jumeirah Living, one of the subsidiaries of Jumeirah Group. The complex will host 45 luxury villas and hotel apartments.


 

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