Philippines' Manila Airport voted world's worst

Reviews rank Ninoy Aquino Airport last due to theft, dirt, facilities

Travel, Manila, Ninoy aquino international airport, Philippines; tourism, World's worst airport

 Ninoy Aquino International Airport, the Philippines’ main airport located in the capital Manila, was voted the world’s worst airport in a global budget-travel guide.

The title was given based on guest complaints of thieving staff, dirty toilets and poor infrastructure at the airport’s Terminal 1 published by readers on sleepinginairports.net.

The country’s government has pledged to improve the 30-year-old facility following the ranking.

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"The customer is always right. This will serve as a challenge to do what we have to do faster and better," Phillippines transport secretary Manuel Roxas told AFP.

"There are already plans and ongoing actions but clearly this is not enough so we will expand our efforts," he added.

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