Blair loves circumlocution. When asked why he had pancakes for breakfast, he ranted about it being legal, his legacy and Bush had them as well. Blair loves circumlocution. When asked why he had pancakes for breakfast, he ranted about it being legal, his legacy and Bush had them as well.

Circumlocution: (n) the use of unnecessarily wordy and indirect language or evasive in speech and writing.

In a sentence:

CEO: Thanks for coming to this meeting.

GM: Not a problem, what’s up?

CEO: Well, the thing is, there have been a lot of ups and downs in the market. Obviously, with this hotel there have been a lot more downs than ups. Of course, it’s a tough market and that is certainly something to be taken into consideration, something the board took into consideration. You are a nice guy and we like you and your family. Fifteen years of loyal service is something not to be sniffed at. There was that incident with the Canadian contortionist, but we all moved on from that, even if the press didn’t. When I receive bad news I have a mantra ‘next time I will be better and stronger’ and that has held me in good stead over the years. Only last week my boy Tommy said to me “Dad, I didn’t make it onto the football team, am I loser?”. I told him no and explained my mantra. Unfortunately, he is now on the cheerleading squad, but that is beside the point…

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GM: With all due respect sir, what is all this circumlocution? What is the point?

CEO: You’re fired.