This file photo taken on November 09, 2012 shows French chef Paul Bocuse posing in his kitchen at LAuberge de Pont de Collonges, during a culinary work shop in Collonges-au-Mont-dOr  Reuters. This file photo taken on November 09, 2012 shows French chef Paul Bocuse posing in his kitchen at LAuberge de Pont de Collonges, during a culinary work shop in Collonges-au-Mont-dOr Reuters.

Paul Bocuse, the father of nouvelle cuisine, has died at the age of 91.

The renowned French chef, who had been suffering from Parkinson's disease for several years, died in his restaurant near Lyon, a local chef close to the family told AFP news agency.

Bocuse rose to fame in the 1970s as a proponent of nouvelle cuisine, a healthier form of cooking, stressing the importance of high quality fresh ingredients.

Bocuse's restaurant, L'Auberge du Pont de Collonges, has had three Michelin stars since 1965 and he was named "chef of the century" by Michelin's rival guide, the Gault-Millau, in 1989, and again by the Culinary Institute of America in 2011.

Named for the chef Paul Bocuse, the Bocuse d'Or, a biennial world chef championship, has been regarded as one of the world's most prestigious cooking competitions since 1987.

French Interior Minister Gérard Collomb broke the news on his twitter feed writing: “Paul Bocuse is dead... The pope of gastronomy has left us”.

Tributes from chefs around the world have poured in.

 

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